4 Ways Your Social Media Presence Could Be Better

Social media has forever changed the way we connect with people.

With the click of a button, you can get insane amounts of information about almost anyone. While this may seem good for your social life, it also means potential employers are able to learn more than wed like them to know.

But these days, its not enough to simply delete your social media profiles taking yourself off the radar of hiring managers only arouses more suspicion. Many companies look you up on social media to gauge whether or not youd be a good fit for them. If they cant even find you online, then they didnt get the answers they were looking for, and theyll move on to the next applicant.

Even if you think your social media pages have nothing damaging to show, theres still a ton you can do to improve your presence and give employers a reason to hire you.To help you better brand yourself, here are four social media tips to not only prevent you from being eliminated, but also make you stand out from the competition.

1. Clean Up the Digital Grime

Kevin just applied for a position at his dream company. A hiring manager who seemed very interested in his qualifications checked his social media pages to make sure he would be a good cultural fit. Everything seemed to be in order until she checked his Facebook to find pictures and statuses detailing his wild, party-animal behavior. Perceived as unprofessional by the recruiter, Kevins application was promptly denied.

You may not realize it, but if youve been on social media for a while, theres bound to besomething a recruiter could find as an excuse not to hire you.In fact, out of the91 percentof employers who use social media to screen applicants, and 69 percent have rejected candidates based on what they found.To combat this, you need to first be able to spot things on your profile that might be incriminating. Google yourself and see what pops up. Comb through your social media pages and delete anything you might think a stranger would find offensive or appalling. Also, change your settings so that your profile is private and secure from strangers eyes.

If you think your social media pages dont quite represent you the way you want, do something about it. Create separate profiles for yourself on the major platforms, and dedicate them solely for professional purposes. Post industry-related content, network with potential employers, and make it as professional as you can. A recruiter might not be able to look at your personal social media profiles (if theyre locked down), but the stuff they can see will reflect the type of professional personality theyre looking for, and the chances of moving on to the next round are that much greater.

Social media has forever changed the way we connect with people.

With the click of a button, you can get insane amounts of information about almost anyone. While this may seem good for your social life, it also means potential employers are able to learn more than wed like them to know.

But these days, its not enough to simply delete your social media profiles taking yourself off the radar of hiring managers only arouses more suspicion. Many companies look you up on social media to gauge whether or not youd be a good fit for them. If they cant even find you online, then they didnt get the answers they were looking for, and theyll move on to the next applicant.

Even if you think your social media pages have nothing damaging to show, theres still a ton you can do to improve your presence and give employers a reason to hire you.To help you better brand yourself, here are four social media tips to not only prevent you from being eliminated, but also make you stand out from the competition.

1. Clean Up the Digital Grime

Kevin just applied for a position at his dream company. A hiring manager who seemed very interested in his qualifications checked his social media pages to make sure he would be a good cultural fit. Everything seemed to be in order until she checked his Facebook to find pictures and statuses detailing his wild, party-animal behavior. Perceived as unprofessional by the recruiter, Kevins application was promptly denied.

You may not realize it, but if youve been on social media for a while, theres bound to besomething a recruiter could find as an excuse not to hire you.In fact, out of the91 percentof employers who use social media to screen applicants, and 69 percent have rejected candidates based on what they found.To combat this, you need to first be able to spot things on your profile that might be incriminating. Google yourself and see what pops up. Comb through your social media pages and delete anything you might think a stranger would find offensive or appalling. Also, change your settings so that your profile is private and secure from strangers eyes.

If you think your social media pages dont quite represent you the way you want, do something about it. Create separate profiles for yourself on the major platforms, and dedicate them solely for professional purposes. Post industry-related content, network with potential employers, and make it as professional as you can. A recruiter might not be able to look at your personal social media profiles (if theyre locked down), but the stuff they can see will reflect the type of professional personality theyre looking for, and the chances of moving on to the next round are that much greater.

2. Strategically Curate Content

After Emily applied to her dream company, she knew she had a good chance of getting the interview. For the past few months leading up to her applying, she had posted a myriad of interesting industry-related articles that she regularly maintained. Every day, she would check the companys social media pages to see if they released any new content. When they did, she shared it on her profile and commented on posts she found especially interesting. All that engagement with the company eventually paid off. Emilys name was already known around the office, and HR was extremely interested to interview someone who loved the business.

After Emily applied to her dream company, she knew she had a good chance of getting the interview. For the past few months leading up to her applying, she had posted a myriad of interesting industry-related articles that she regularly maintained. Every day, she would check the companys social media pages to see if they released any new content. When they did, she shared it on her profile and commented on posts she found especially interesting. All that engagement with the company eventually paid off. Emilys name was already known around the office, and HR was extremely interested to interview someone who loved the business.